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Can you imagine the world without adhesive labels?

Can you imagine the world without adhesive labels?

Open your refrigerator, open your kitchen cupboards – and then your medical cabinet, bathroom drawers and more. Everywhere you look, there are adhesive labels: on your packaged meat, on your canned goods – on your prescription bottles, cosmetics, toiletries and more. Adhesive labels are taken for granted nowadays but, in the big scheme of things, they haven’t been around all that long. The roots of today’s labels began with a process called lithography. This was developed when a Bavarian playwright, Alois Senefelder, figured out how to duplicate his play’s scripts in 1796: he wrote the text with a greasy crayon on limestone and then printed them by rolling on ink. Artists quickly began using this technique – and, by the 1880s, businesses began creating colorful advertisements using lithography. These included eye-catching labels that were attached to products using a form of gum. These labels are sought by collectors now, including those plastered on crates of fruit, vegetables and cigars, flour sacks and more. Although these added a nice touch of color to otherwise mundane packaging, the purpose was really more practical. Because products were put into whatever containers were available, the containers themselves weren’t always the same, and so customers needed to know what was inside.

Adhesive label revolution

In 1935, a man named R. Stanton “Stan” Avery created the first self-adhesive label, which consisted of a layer of paper coated with adhesive and then a protective liner. He created his labeling machine after receiving an investment of $100 from schoolteacher Dorothy Durfee – a woman who later became his first wife. The motor of his self-adhesive labels came from a washing machine, and other parts came from a sewing machine and a saber saw. Barcodes  Enter the barcodes. In the late 1940s, a graduate student at the Drexel Institute of Technology in Philadelphia, Bernard Silver, partnered with Norman Joseph Woodland to invent a way to encode data in circles. This was based on the Morse code and was patented in 1952. Unfortunately, they didn’t invent a system to read the code and so the patent expired without any practical applications. In the 1970s, IBM’s Universal Product Code was created, similar to the previous system but using vertical lines rather than circles. In 1974, the first item – a pack of chewing gum in a supermarket in Troy, Ohio – was scanned. Two years later, with little interest in barcodes to date, Business Week called them “The Supermarket Scanner That Failed.” In the 1980s, though, bigger retailers such as Kmart began using barcodes and they became the standard. It’s incredible how much barcode label technology has advanced; see what we can do for you.

Barcodes

Enter the barcodes. In the late 1940s, a graduate student at the Drexel Institute of Technology in Philadelphia, Bernard Silver, partnered with Norman Joseph Woodland to invent a way to encode data in circles. This was based on the Morse code and was patented in 1952. Unfortunately, they didn’t invent a system to read the code and so the patent expired without any practical applications.

In the 1970s, IBM’s Universal Product Code was created, similar to the previous system but using vertical lines rather than circles. In 1974, the first item – a pack of chewing gum in a supermarket in Troy, Ohio – was scanned.

Two years later, with little interest in barcodes to date, Business Week called them “The Supermarket Scanner That Failed.” In the 1980s, though, bigger retailers such as Kmart began using barcodes and they became the standard.

It’s incredible how much barcode label technology has advanced; see what we can do for you.

How can we help with your adhesive labels?

Technology has come a long way from 1796 when lithography was first invented. It’s come a long way since the 1980s – and continues to evolve. Contact Adhesa Plate for your adhesive label needs, both now and in the future. If you have questions or want to talk about your labeling needs, call 1-800-634-9701 now or email us at sales@adhesaplate.com

Adhesa Plate Graphic Overlay Solutions

Graphic overlays are the ideal solution for creating unique and custom designs for your industrial equipment or electronic device. Offering accurate cutouts for switches or keypads to transparent windows for LED or LCD displays, we can create the graphic overlay that will enhance your products image using UL 969 certified materials and manufacturing processes.

Adhesa Plate Options

We pride ourselves on offering a wide variety of options for our clients. There’s really no limit to our adhesive label capabilities. Tinted transparent LED windows, custom embossed keypads, selective adhesive applications and internal cutouts are just a few of the choices you have when designing your label.

For design, there are really no limitations. We can use digital UV inkjet printing for crisp, unlimited colors and variable data like sequential barcodes or hexadecimal 2D barcodes or UID codes.  For precise cutting, Adhesa Plate offers conventional steel rule die cutting, digital laser or plotter cutting for custom cut shapes.

Call your Graphic Overlay Specialists Today!

There’s really no limit to our adhesive label capabilities.  Whether you have a design or just an idea, we can identify your product in a way that will create an impressive 1st impression.  Call us today for a free quote and consultation at 1.800.634.9701.

What is Variable Data Printing?

Have you ever wondered how mass labels are printed with unique content – like a barcode, QR code, or UPC? This is made possible by a printing technique called Variable Data Printing (VDP) and the end result is variable data labels.

Variable Data Printing is a form of digital printing in which varying data can be printed on each label. This technique enables fast printing of a large number of labels for various units of a product, facilitating easy identification.

How Does Variable Data Printing Work?

The process is simple. The data comes from a client provided database of unique information. The database is loaded, and the information integrated with our printing machine. The overall process is seamless and efficient, allowing for a cost effective, unique labeling solution.

Examples of Variable Data Printing Applications

Marketing: Variable Data Printing is widely used in marketing. Printed labels with individual names or customized information tend to yield a higher response rate than a generic printed piece.

Tracking: With QR codes, a company can add an individually coded label for signage or a printed piece and track the number of visits to the landing page or website.

Inventory: Printing sequential number labels in bulk is simple with Variable Data Printing making inventory day easy. Each adhesive label can have unique numbers or text and barcode as needed.

Customize your Labels

As with any of our labels, we can print a custom branded look. If you simply need a templated label with only room for the varying data, we can provide that also. And with our thermal transfer digital print and plot cutter options, you have

Call your Adesa Plate label printing specialists at 1.800.634.9701 to get started on your Variable Data Printing project.